ROCK DRILL SAFETY TIPS

ROCK DRILL SAFETY TIP 1

Always blow or flush out air and water hoses before connecting them to the rock drill

WHY: When the machine is off, and disconnected dirt, small stones and other undesirables get into the hoses. A quick flush ensures these stay out of the machine keeping the operator safe, and it gives the machine a longer life span.

ROCK DRILL SAFETY TIP 2

Plug air and water inlets when the hoses are disconnected

WHY: This is to keep out the undesirables that could damage or ruin the machine

ROCK DRILL SAFETY TIP 3

Always fit a line-lubricator preferably on the inlet stem, but no further than two metres from the drill. Ensure that the line lubricator is working correctly and filled with the correct grade of oil or grease.

WHY: As with any moving part that creates friction, proper lubrication is essential for long and efficient Rock Drill life.

ROCK DRILL SAFETY TIP 4

Check the drill steel for shank end damage and correct shank length. The end of the drill steel shank must be flat and square to the axis and evenly chamfered inside and out

WHY: The business end of the machine can be compared to shaving. If the razor blade is blunt, it is not going to work, take you longer and may injure you. Always keep that analogy in mind

Blasting


Surface Preparation Methods

Surface Preparation Methods

Shotblasting

This method is a one-step process which strips, cleans and etches simultaneously. All dust and contaminants are collected by a vacuum system which permits the immediate application of the coating system. All deposits of oil or grease must be removed before shotblasting.

Mechanical Scarification

This method uses a machine which grinds, cuts, sands, or breaks away the top layer of the surface to expose a clean, fresh exterior. All deposits of oil or grease must be removed before scarifying.

Sandblasting

Either wet or dry blasting can be used. Blasting of concrete requires removal of loose and powdery concrete along with laitance. Vacuuming or air blasting is required to remove all sand and dust. All deposits of oil or grease must be removed before blasting.

Types of Surfaces

Concrete

The concrete must be thoroughly cleaned with a strong detergent to remove grease and oils. The floor should be thoroughly wetted before application of detergent and thoroughly rinsed after cleaning. Any loose concrete should be removed. Holes and cracks should be filled before application of a coating. Coating older but uncoated concrete floors is done in much the same manner as new concrete.

Steel

Minimum surface prep required is sandblast to ensure removal of rust, mill scale, oxidation or old coatings. If this is not possible, an acceptable alternative is mechanical preparation, if carefully done. A degreasing solvent wipe is recommended prior to blasting or sanding. Blasted surfaces must be coated within 8 hours to prevent rust bloom.

Wood

A clean, sound wood surface is required. Remove any oils and dirt from surface by suitable means, using degreasing solvent or strong detergents. Sanding or mechanical cleaning is then required to remove loose or deteriorated surface wood to obtain the proper surface profile.

Plastic

Sandblast or power sand lightly to remove surface contaminants, old coatings, etc. New plastic surfaces require light sanding or brush blast to remove mold release and other adhesion inhibitors. A solvent wipe is recommended before blasting or sanding.

Painted Surfaces

If the paint is peeling or degrading in any way, it should be completely removed by sanding, blasting or stripping. If previous coating is completely intact, the surface may be cleaned with a strong detergent or solvent and scuff-sanded to remove the gloss. If there is any indication that lead paint is present, EPA procedures must be followed.